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Class Of 2020

Fellowship s YoNas 1

YoNasDa Lone Wolf

(Pronounced Yo-Naja-Ha)
Human Rights Activist/ National Organizer
Public Speaker/ Rap Artist/ Published Writer

YoNasDa (Yo-Naja- Ha) LoneWolf, Oglala Lakota and African American, was born during the American Indian Movement & 1978’s The Longest Walk in Washington, DC. She is a National Community Organizer/Human Rights Activist and a motivational speaker.

She began as a rap artist and choreographer for BET’S own Teen Summit and continues her work as an active activist and a voice against injustice. She has used entertainment to bring awareness on the condition of oppressed people whether it’s releasing two albums and touring with Wutang Clan or performing at the Annual Gathering of Nations Pow Wow and Festival.

She created #BMoreYouthRise and the National Stop the Killing rallies and marches after two of her friends were killed by police brutality. She has organized in cities from Phoenix, AZ to Baltimore, MD. She was asked by the family of Mike Brown Jr in Ferguson, MO to speak at his 1-year anniversary and her speech against police brutality was featured in Elle Magazine (France). She also was on the BET Rap it Up Tour, promoting sexual education.

Since 2006, she has directed entertainment panel discussions at various colleges and universities and at the annual Nation of Islam conference called Saviors Day with over 100,000 people. This truth-teller is a published writer who has a weekly column in the Final Call Newspaper and is now bringing her artistry to the world with a children’s book called “The Adventures of Star Song” and a daily devotional book called “Journey 2 Peace”.

She is currently filming a docu-series based on connecting the similarities of people from all walks of life. She also started a cultural tour called “Rez Tours “; which she opens cultural tours to teach about the culture of Indigenous people. She has hosted a radio show on Chuck D Rapstation.com and Atlanta’s “Voice of the People” radio. She was a special guest on NYC Power 105’s The Breakfast Club for “Indigenous Peoples Day” in 2015 and 2016. She spearheaded national fundraising events Hip Hop 4 Haiti and Hip Hop 4 Flint in 2016. In September 2017, she started Hip Hop 4 Foundation and spearheaded “15 cities for Hip Hop 4 The People” after the devastating hurricane that hit Texas, Florida and the Carribean. YoNasDa was on the executive planning committee and co-convener for the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March- Justice or Else! She also accepted the invitation to be a National Co-Convener of the Women’s March.

Her late mother Wauneta Lonewolf, an Oglala Lakota, was a renowned motivational speaker, substance abuse, gang prevention counselor and healer. Her father, who is African American, is a fine artist. YoNasDa Lonewolf promotes love, justice and equality.

YoNasDa Lone Wolf

(Pronounced Yo-Naja-Ha)
Human Rights Activist/ National Organizer
Public Speaker/ Rap Artist/ Published Writer

YoNasDa (Yo-Naja- Ha) LoneWolf, Oglala Lakota and African American, was born during the American Indian Movement & 1978’s The Longest Walk in Washington, DC. She is a National Community Organizer/Human Rights Activist and a motivational speaker.

She began as a rap artist and choreographer for BET’S own Teen Summit and continues her work as an active activist and a voice against injustice. She has used entertainment to bring awareness on the condition of oppressed people whether it’s releasing two albums and touring with Wutang Clan or performing at the Annual Gathering of Nations Pow Wow and Festival.

She created #BMoreYouthRise and the National Stop the Killing rallies and marches after two of her friends were killed by police brutality. She has organized in cities from Phoenix, AZ to Baltimore, MD. She was asked by the family of Mike Brown Jr in Ferguson, MO to speak at his 1-year anniversary and her speech against police brutality was featured in Elle Magazine (France). She also was on the BET Rap it Up Tour, promoting sexual education.

Since 2006, she has directed entertainment panel discussions at various colleges and universities and at the annual Nation of Islam conference called Saviors Day with over 100,000 people. This truth-teller is a published writer who has a weekly column in the Final Call Newspaper and is now bringing her artistry to the world with a children’s book called “The Adventures of Star Song” and a daily devotional book called “Journey 2 Peace”.

She is currently filming a docu-series based on connecting the similarities of people from all walks of life. She also started a cultural tour called “Rez Tours “; which she opens cultural tours to teach about the culture of Indigenous people. She has hosted a radio show on Chuck D Rapstation.com and Atlanta’s “Voice of the People” radio. She was a special guest on NYC Power 105’s The Breakfast Club for “Indigenous Peoples Day” in 2015 and 2016. She spearheaded national fundraising events Hip Hop 4 Haiti and Hip Hop 4 Flint in 2016. In September 2017, she started Hip Hop 4 Foundation and spearheaded “15 cities for Hip Hop 4 The People” after the devastating hurricane that hit Texas, Florida and the Carribean. YoNasDa was on the executive planning committee and co-convener for the 20th Anniversary of the Million Man March- Justice or Else! She also accepted the invitation to be a National Co-Convener of the Women’s March.

Her late mother Wauneta Lonewolf, an Oglala Lakota, was a renowned motivational speaker, substance abuse, gang prevention counselor and healer. Her father, who is African American, is a fine artist. YoNasDa Lonewolf promotes love, justice and equality.

Fellowship s YoNas 1
Fellowship s Jordan Marie Daniel

Jordan Marie Daniel

Jordan is a citizen of Kul Wicasa Oyate (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe) as well as a passionate and devoted advocate for Indian Country and all people.

Nationally known for her advocacy and grassroots organization for anti-pipelines/climate-racial-social justice efforts, change the name, the epidemic and crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women (MMIW), and native youth initiatives. Founder of Rising Hearts – Indigenous led grassroots organizing, elevating and centering Indigenous voices and building collaborative partnerships through targeted outreach and advocacy.

Jordan is a Producer and Consultant for documentary films and TV series. And she is currently using her running platform – #RunningForJustice, to raise awareness and run in prayer for stolen Indigenous relatives and helping to raise awareness of Black lives taken by police violence and white supremacy.

Fellowship s Morning Star Gali 1

Morning Star Gali

(Ajumawi band of Pit River) Morning Star is the project director of Restoring Justice for Indigenous Peoples (www.indigenousjustice.org).

She is also the Tribal Water Organizer for Save CA Salmon and serves as the California Tribal & Community Liaison for the International Indian Treaty Council. From 2012-2016 she worked as the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Pit River Tribe, and from 2016 to 2018, she was a Rosenberg Leading Edge Fellow focusing on the disproportionate impact of the criminal and juvenile justice systems on Native Americans.

Morning Star continues to lead large-scale actions while helping organize Native cultural, spiritual, scholarly, and political gatherings throughout California. She is deeply committed to advocating for Indigenous sovereignty issues such as missing and murdered Indigenous women, climate justice, gender justice, and sacred sites protection on behalf of the tribal and intertribal communities in which she was raised.

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Fellowship Holly T. Bird

Holly T. Bird

(San Felipe Pueblo/ Perepucha/Yaqui) Holly has a long history of community activism in both environmental and Indigenous issues. In college she canvassed for the Public Interest Research Group in MI, an environmental lobbying group focusing on water contamination. While attending law school in the late 90’s Holly created the Illinois Native American Bar Association and is credited for removing the “Redskins” mascot from a local school system. She is a published author of articles involving Native American law and indigenous rights that are quoted regularly by the US Office of Civil Rights. She has provided statewide trainings on Indian child welfare for the state of Michigan.

In 2008, Ms. Bird was appointed as an Acting Chief Judge / Associate Judge for the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, where she served until 2011. In 2010, she was appointed to serve as an Associate Supreme Court Judge for the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi Indians and continues in that capacity today. In 2013, Ms. Bird was awarded the prestigious American Arbitration Association’s 2013 Higginbotham Fellowship and became the first Native American arbitrator in the US.

Ms. Bird currently served in various capacities, including Co-Executive Director for the Water Protectors Legal Collective, the leading legal service at the NoDAPL camp/protest in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe from 2016 to 2020. She also founded and serves as the Executive Director for the MI Water Protectors Legal Task Force, a project of the National Lawyer’s Guild. Currently, she is on the team at Title Track, a Michigan non-profit corporation dedicated to youth, water, racial justice and equity through creative practice. On top of all of this, Ms. Bird maintains a private practice in Traverse City, concentrating in matters of Native American, cannabis, family, criminal, probate, and employment law.

Holly T. Bird

(San Felipe Pueblo/ Perepucha/Yaqui) Holly has a long history of community activism in both environmental and Indigenous issues. In college she canvassed for the Public Interest Research Group in MI, an environmental lobbying group focusing on water contamination. While attending law school in the late 90’s Holly created the Illinois Native American Bar Association and is credited for removing the “Redskins” mascot from a local school system. She is a published author of articles involving Native American law and indigenous rights that are quoted regularly by the US Office of Civil Rights. She has provided statewide trainings on Indian child welfare for the state of Michigan.

In 2008, Ms. Bird was appointed as an Acting Chief Judge / Associate Judge for the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, where she served until 2011. In 2010, she was appointed to serve as an Associate Supreme Court Judge for the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi Indians and continues in that capacity today. In 2013, Ms. Bird was awarded the prestigious American Arbitration Association’s 2013 Higginbotham Fellowship and became the first Native American arbitrator in the US.

Ms. Bird currently served in various capacities, including Co-Executive Director for the Water Protectors Legal Collective, the leading legal service at the NoDAPL camp/protest in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe from 2016 to 2020. She also founded and serves as the Executive Director for the MI Water Protectors Legal Task Force, a project of the National Lawyer’s Guild. Currently, she is on the team at Title Track, a Michigan non-profit corporation dedicated to youth, water, racial justice and equity through creative practice. On top of all of this, Ms. Bird maintains a private practice in Traverse City, concentrating in matters of Native American, cannabis, family, criminal, probate, and employment law.

Fellowship s Raye Zaragoza 1

Raye Zaragoza

(Pronounced ray zay-rah-GO-zah)

Raye is an award-winning singer-songwriter who carries an acoustic guitar and a message.

Her quiet yet powerful song “In the River,” written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, garnered half a million video views, national media coverage, and a Global Music Award and Honesty Oscar. Her forthcoming sophomore LP recorded with Tucker Martine (The Decemberists, First Aid Kit) will be released in 2020.

Writing about social issues comes naturally to Raye. “As a woman of color in America, social issues are things you deal with and see every day of your life,” she says. “I write about my experience and oftentimes my existence has been laced with injustice.”

Raye Zaragoza

(Pronounced ray zay-rah-GO-zah)

Raye is an award-winning singer-songwriter who carries an acoustic guitar and a message.

Her quiet yet powerful song “In the River,” written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, garnered half a million video views, national media coverage, and a Global Music Award and Honesty Oscar. Her forthcoming sophomore LP recorded with Tucker Martine (The Decemberists, First Aid Kit) will be released in 2020.

Writing about social issues comes naturally to Raye. “As a woman of color in America, social issues are things you deal with and see every day of your life,” she says. “I write about my experience and oftentimes my existence has been laced with injustice.”

Fellowship s Raye Zaragoza 1
Fellowship s Lyla June 1

Lyla June

Lyla is an Indigenous musician, scholar and community organizer of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages.

Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing. She blends studies in Human Ecology at Stanford, graduate work in Indigenous Pedagogy, and the traditional worldview she grew up with to inform her music, perspectives and solutions.

She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree, focusing on Indigenous food systems revitalization.

Fellowship s Sivan Alyra Rose 1

Sivan Alyra Rose

Sivan Alyra Rose is an Apache/Puerto Rican actress, runway model and exhibited artist. Sivan is the first Native American female lead of television series “Chambers” on Netflix premiering in April 2019, starring alongside Uma Thurman and Tony Goldwyn. She was raised just outside of Phoenix, Arizona on the San Carlos Apache reservation by her mother and grandmother. She was discovered modeling at the Santa Fe Indian Market at the age of 16.

In 2017, Sivan attended the Institute of American Indian Arts studying Studio Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She has starred in the short horror student film by Mark Lewis “The Entrada”. In 2018, she was cast as the lead of an American Film Institute project “Running Shadow” directed by Carlos Betancourt. “Running Shadow” is a short fiction film about a young Lakota woman battling grief over her sister’s suicide and pursuing competitive running.

Sivan is passionate about utilizing her platform to raise awareness about Native American issues especially the need for mental health care support and resources for Native American youth.

Fellowship s Sivan Alyra Rose 1
Fellowship Allie Young

Allie young

Allie is a citizen of the Diné (Navajo) Nation from the Northern Agency of the reservation in Northern New Mexico.

She is a storyteller and writer on a mission to increase authentic representation of Native Americans in TV, film, and mainstream media by sharing the stories and traditions of her people that helped and continue to help them persevere in a world where they are largely invisible, underrepresented and misrepresented. She’s developing projects, one of which she’s pitched to Netflix and Amazon Studios.

Recently, she co-founded Protect the Sacred, a grassroots initiative started in response to the COVID-19 crisis on the Navajo Nation. The initiative helps to communicate with Navajo youth about the risks of COVID-19 and the importance of staying home to protect our elders – the keepers and carriers of our stories, language, medicine ways, and culture. It is vital to our tribal communities to protect what culture remains after centuries of colonization and forced assimilation.

Fellowship s Candi Brings Plenty 1

Candi Brings Plenty

Candi Brings Plenty is a Queer Indigenous, Non-binary Two Spirit, Oglala Lakota Sioux. She is a protector of the sacred and activist for Indigenous justice. Her red lipstick is her war paint, as she takes her place on the frontlines as a Two Spirit Warrior Queen. She continues to travel throughout Turtle Island sharing her experience as a Two Spirit Water Protector at Standing Rock, while elevating traditional methods of trauma healing.

Because the intersections between resource extraction and violence against Indigenous womxn and Two Spirit peoples are seldom discussed in mainstream social justice movements, Candi brings awareness as an activist for Indigenous womxn and Two Spirit communities facing the brunt of settler colonial violence, including ecocide and genocide, at a global scale.

Candi Brings Plenty is a direct descendent of Crazy Horse’s band and is a survivor of the Wounded Knee Massacre. She currently lives in the Black Hills, in Rapid City, SD where she works as the first ACLU Indigenous Justice Organizer for the South Dakota, North Dakota & Wyoming region.

She has been recognized for her work through numerous awards and media spotlights, including Community Leader of the Year by the City of Portland and Gender Advocate of the Year by Facing Race. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies, with an emphasis in Tribal Laws & Treaties, a graduate certificate in Public & Non-profit Management, and pursued a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Portland State University.

Candi continues to utilize her platform to advocate for Two Spirit visibility and empowering Indigenous voices to be seen and heard. She is also striving to evolve the frontlines regardless if it’s on the legislative floor or on the ground amplifying grassroots warriors.

Candi Brings Plenty

Candi Brings Plenty is a Queer Indigenous, Non-binary Two Spirit, Oglala Lakota Sioux. She is a protector of the sacred and activist for Indigenous justice. Her red lipstick is her war paint, as she takes her place on the frontlines as a Two Spirit Warrior Queen. She continues to travel throughout Turtle Island sharing her experience as a Two Spirit Water Protector at Standing Rock, while elevating traditional methods of trauma healing.

Because the intersections between resource extraction and violence against Indigenous womxn and Two Spirit peoples are seldom discussed in mainstream social justice movements, Candi brings awareness as an activist for Indigenous womxn and Two Spirit communities facing the brunt of settler colonial violence, including ecocide and genocide, at a global scale.

Candi Brings Plenty is a direct descendent of Crazy Horse’s band and is a survivor of the Wounded Knee Massacre. She currently lives in the Black Hills, in Rapid City, SD where she works as the first ACLU Indigenous Justice Organizer for the South Dakota, North Dakota & Wyoming region.

She has been recognized for her work through numerous awards and media spotlights, including Community Leader of the Year by the City of Portland and Gender Advocate of the Year by Facing Race. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies, with an emphasis in Tribal Laws & Treaties, a graduate certificate in Public & Non-profit Management, and pursued a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Portland State University.

Candi continues to utilize her platform to advocate for Two Spirit visibility and empowering Indigenous voices to be seen and heard. She is also striving to evolve the frontlines regardless if it’s on the legislative floor or on the ground amplifying grassroots warriors.

Fellowship s Candi Brings Plenty 1